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 >>  Maintenance
Instrument Maintenance
  • Care of Your Instruments

    Handle instruments gently - avoid dropping, striking or overstraining


  • A few words on Tungsten Carbide tipped instruments

    Do not use steel wool, wire brushes, highly acidic or alkaline corrosive or abrasive cleaners or detergents. The passive protective film, which forms on the surface of stainless steel instruments through constant use, repeated washing drying and sterilization is liable to be damaged


  • Light or dark spots

    Do not use steel wool, wire brushes, highly acidic or alkaline corrosive or abrasive cleaners or detergents. The passive protective film, which forms on the surface of stainless steel instruments through constant use, repeated washing drying and sterilizat kh oioiu oiuo iuo ion is liable to be damaged


  • Brown stains

    Do not use steel wool, wire brushes, highly acidic or alkaline corrosive or abrasive cleaners or detergents. The passive protective film, which forms on the surface of stainless steel instruments through constant use, repeated washing drying and sterilization is liable to be damaged


  • Blue stains

    Do not use steel wool, wire brushes, highly acidic or alkaline corrosive or abrasive cleaners or detergents. The passive protective film, which forms on the surface of stainless steel instruments through constant use, repeated washing drying and sterilization is liable to be damaged


  • Purplish-Black stains

    Do not use steel wool, wire brushes, highly acidic or alkaline corrosive or abrasive cleaners or detergents. The passive protective film, which forms on the surface of stainless steel instruments through constant use, repeated washing drying and sterilization is liable to be damaged


  • Rust spots

    It is unlikely that surgical grade stainless steel will rust. What appears as rust is actually residual organic matters or mineral deposits in box locks, ratchets, serrations, hinges etc. which have been baked on to the surface. Sterilization of stainless instruments together with plated instruments of dissimilar material should be avoided. Chipped or imperfectly plated carbon steel instruments will cause rust deposits on stainless steel instruments. Electrolytic action will carry carbon particles from the exposed metal on to the stainless steel surface. These particles promptly oxidize and the stainless steel instrument appears to have rusted. A rust-coloured film on instruments can be caused by the high mineral content or by the use of water softeners.


  • Corrosion

    Presence of blood and soil in box locks, ratchets, serrations, hinges etc. can cause corrosion. More care should be taken in cleaning. Excessive moisture left on the surface of the instrument can lead to corrosion. Preheat the autoclave, do not rush the drying time. Foreign matters deposited in the autoclave can result in spotting and corrosion of instruments. Inner surfaces of the autoclave should be given a routine maintenance. Wipe down with acetic acid (equal parts of vinegar and distilled water) to remove any impurities. Stress corrosion can be caused by not opening box locks during sterilization procedure. The heating-up and cooling-down process during sterilization causes tension in the material.


  • Pitting

    When instruments are exposed to saline solutions, blood, iodine, potassium chloride and other compounds pitting will occur. Instruments should be rinsed thoroughly immediately after exposure. Pitting can also be traced to detergents with a high pH level (B-9) used for instrument cleaning. Instruments should be thoroughly rinsed after cleaning. It is impossible to completely restore an instrument after pitting or rust has eroded the hard surface. The instrument should be replaced immediately as a pitted instrument is far more susceptible to further corrosion.